Oven Roasted Chicken

We’re often asked what the easiest way is to prepare a whole chicken. The oven roasting method is what we use most often but this recipe can also be used for a smoker or grill if you have the ability to control temperature.

We’re often asked what the easiest way is to prepare a whole chicken. The oven roasting method is what we use most often but this recipe can also be used for a smoker or grill if you have the ability to control temperature.

Using our Chicken Rub takes the guess work out of how much salt and which seasonings to use but don’t be afraid to mix up your own blend by following the instructions below! Wondering what to do with the leftovers after enjoying your roasted chicken? Check out our recipe and instructional video for making chicken & dumpling soup!

Oven Roasted Chicken

We're often asked what the easiest way is to prepare a whole chicken. The oven roasting method is what we use most often, but this recipe can also be used for a smoker or a grill if you have the ability to temperature control.
Print Pin
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: American
Keyword: chicken
Cook Time: 3 hours
Marinating: 1 day
Total Time: 1 day 3 hours
Servings: 8 servings

Equipment

  • Oven, Grill, or Smoker
  • Large Baking Dish

Ingredients

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 325 or 300 if using convection.
  • Season liberally with chicken rub (or salt and herbs), making sure to get under the skin between the leg and breast.
  • Let sit for at least 30 minutes (all day or overnight is even better).
  • Place chicken in baking dish, breast side up and coat skin with lard or cooking oil.
  • Bake for 1½ hours and then turn the chicken over, breast side down.
  • Bake for an additional 1½ hours or until leg joints are loose and skin is crisp.

Chicken & Dumpling Soup

One of our family favorites.  Great with homemade broth or your favorite store bought.  Check out the video for full instructions on how to make broth, soup & dumplings! One pot of soup goes a long way & makes great leftovers.

One of our family favorites.  Great with homemade broth or your favorite store bought.  Check out the video for full instructions on how to make broth, soup & dumplings! One pot of soup goes a long way & makes great leftovers.   Additional dumplings can be made and added to the soup when reheating if desired.

Chicken & Dumpling Soup

One of our family favorites. Great with homemade broth or your favorite store bought. Check out the video below for full instructions! Perfect use for leftovers from a roast chicken.
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Course: Soup
Cuisine: American
Keyword: chicken
Prep Time: 8 hours
Total Time: 8 hours
Servings: 8 servings

Equipment

  • Stock Pot
  • Mixing Bowls

Ingredients

For the Broth

  • Bones and skin from 1 chicken
  • Enough water to cover bones
  • salt to taste
  • 1 Large onion sliced
  • 4 Celery stalks
  • 3 Cloves garlic
  • Herbs including: tarragon thyme, rosemary, parsley, etc.

For the Soup

  • 1 to 2 Cups celery
  • 1 Large onion
  • 1 to 2 Cups carrot
  • 3 Cloves garlic
  • Salt & Pepper
  • Cooked chicken meat
  • Optional additions - cabbage greens, spinach or kale, additional herbs

For the Dumplings

  • 2 1/4 Cups All purpose flour
  • 3 Duck or 4 chicken eggs
  • 3/4 Cup water

Instructions

  • Remove meat from bones and add to pot along with water, salt, onion, garlic, herbs and celery over meduim-high heat.
  • Once the water begins to boil, reduce heat to low and continue to simmer for 2 to 8 hours stirring occasionally. The longer you simmer the better the broth!
  • Remove broth from heat source and strain through a mesh strainer or cheesecloth into a clean pot. While the broth is cooking prepare the soup ingredients. Chop celery, carrots, garlic and onion and sauté in lard or butter.
  • Combine broth, vegetables and chicken over medium high heat. Add additional herbs and salt to taste.
  • Prepare dumplings. Combine flour, eggs and water in a medium sized mixing bowl. Dough should be sticky - add more flour or water if needed (watch our how to video for tips!)
  • Bring soup to a low boil. Drop dumpling dough in one small scoop at a time. Dough will sink and then come to the surface as they cook
  • Bring soup to a low boil. Drop dumpling dough in one small scoop at a time. Dough will sink and then come to the surface as they cook. Add greens & enjoy!

Video

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Egg & Sausage Cups

Easy, customizable & healthy breakfast for the whole family. Recipe makes 4 Individual cups but can easily be doubled.

Easy, customizable & healthy breakfast for the whole family. Recipe makes 4 Individual cups but can easily be doubled.

All of the ingredients needed to make this recipe are available for pre-order and pick up or delivery on Tuesday, March 24th!  We’re also teaming up with other local producers to offer fresh baked rolls & bread, butter and pea shoots along with our normal offerings.  Easy online ordering can be found here: Pick Up & Delivery Options

Egg & Sausage Cups

Easy, customizable & healthy breakfast for the whole family. Recipe makes 4 individual cups but can easily be doubled.
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Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: American
Keyword: eggs
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
Servings: 4 cups

Equipment

  • Muffin Tin

Ingredients

  • Mossycup Farms Breakfast sausage or chorizo
  • 2 Strips Mossycup Farms Bacon
  • 1/4 Red onion
  • Greens pea shoots, spinach or other
  • 3 Free Range Eggs
  • Optional Additions: green onion tomato, bell pepper

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350.
  • Press breakfast sausage into bottom of muffin pan cups filling 1/3 and bake for 5 minutes.
  • While sausage is baking cut bacon and onion into bite size pieces and sauté together until cooked but not crisp.
  • Remove sausage from oven - do not drain extra fat (will prevent sticking and add flavor). Add layer of bacon & onion and greens or other toppings.
  • Beat eggs together and fill cups the rest of the way.
  • Bake 10 to 15 minutes or until eggs look fully cooked. Enjoy!

 

Our Go-to Waffle Recipe

This recipe can be made with any all purpose flour or milk. 3 of the 4 people in our house are gluten and dairy free so I use this gluten free flour and full fat coconut milk. Using lard in the recipe gives the waffles a nice, crispy outer shell. These are our kids favorite and is the recipe we make when we have overnight guests and want “normal” tasting allergy friendly waffles. Enjoy!

Interested in purchasing lard to render and cook with at home? Contact us for details. Did you know that when you purchase a custom whole or half hog share the Ventura Locker will render the lard for you? Check out our online store for details on reserving a pork share.

Our Go-to Waffle Recipe

This recipe can be made with any all purpose flour or milk. 3 of the 4 people in our house are gluten and dairy free so I use this gluten free flour and full fat coconut milk. Using lard in the recipe gives the waffles a nice, crispy outer shell. These are our kids favorite and is the recipe we make when we have overnight guests and want “normal” tasting allergy friendly waffles. Enjoy!
Interested in purchasing lard to render and cook with at home? Contact us for details. Did you know that when you purchase a custom whole or half hog share the Ventura Locker will render the lard for you? Check out our online store for details on reserving a pork share.
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Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: American
Keyword: eggs, lard

Ingredients

  • cups Gluten-Free Flour Blend or All Purpose Flour
  • 1 tbsp Baking Powder
  • 3 tbsp Sugar
  • ½ tsp Salt
  • 1 tsp Cinnamon
  • 2 large Free Range Eggs
  • ½ cup Lard or oil
  • 2 cups Milk (we use whole fat coconut milk)
  • 1 tsp Vanilla Extract

Instructions

  • Preheat waffle iron and coat with lard or cooking spray.
  • Whisk together flour, baking powder, sugar, salt and cinnamon until well combined.
  • Add remaining ingredients to the dry ingredients and mix well (batter should be a bit thick).
  • Scoop batter onto hot waffle iron and cook until golden brown.
  • Serve hot with butter and syrup or your favorite toppings.

 

Maple Glazed Donut Holes

The trick to the perfect donut hole?  Lard.  These rarely get the chance to cool down before being gobbled up in our house.  Can be made gluten and dairy free if desired.

Maple Glazed Donut Holes

The trick to the perfect donut hole?  Lard.  These rarely get the chance to cool down before being gobbled up in our house.  Can be made gluten and dairy free if desired.
Print Pin
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: American
Keyword: eggs, lard
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 12

Equipment

  • Heavy-Bottomed Pot or Fryer

Ingredients

  • 4 cups Lard for frying
  • 2 cups Gluten-Free Flour Blend or All Purpose Flour
  • 2 tbsp Local Honey
  • 3 tsp Baking Powder
  • ½ tsp Salt
  • 2 cup Milk (full fat coconut milk for dairy-free)
  • 1 large Free Range Egg
  • ¼ cup Butter melted (or dairy-free alternative)

Maple Glaze

  • 1 cup Powdered Sugar
  • 3 tbsp Butter melted (or dairy-free alternative)
  • cup Great River Maple Syrup (robust for extra flavor)

Instructions

  • Heat lard in a heavy-bottomed pot or fryer until a temperate of 350 degrees is reached.
  • In one bowl, mix together the dry ingredients. In another bowl, whisk the milk and egg together and then add to dry ingredients along with the melted butter until a soft, but thick dough forms. Adjust milk and flour as necessary.
  • Using a cookie scoop or spoon, scoop dough into a ball and drop into hot lard, working in batches.
  • Remove the donut holes from the lard using a slotted spoon onto a baking sheet lined with paper towels.
  • Whisk glaze ingredients together and dip the slightly cooled (but still warm) donut holes into the glaze.

Whipped Lard With Herbs

I’ve made this recipe twice in the last month – once for the Field Day we hosted at our farm in August and again this weekend for the Preservation Celebration at the Central Gardens of North Iowa. It’s pretty fabulous when smeared on some crusty sourdough bread. Another option is to make this recipe with half lard and half butter.

Whipped Lard with Herbs

It’s pretty fabulous when smeared on some crusty sourdough bread. Another option is to make this recipe with half lard and half butter. Any fresh or dried herbs that you like can be substituted here!
Print Pin
Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: American
Keyword: lard
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Chill Time: 1 hour
Total Time: 1 hour 5 minutes
Servings: 1 bowl
Author: Laura Tidrick

Equipment

  • Saucepan
  • Electric Mixer

Ingredients

  • 2-3 cups Mossycup Farms Leaf Lard
  • 1 clove Garlic finely chopped
  • 1 tbsp Garlic Scape, Shallot, or Scallions finely chopped
  • 1 tsp Herbs parsley, chives, rosemary, thyme, etc.
  • Salt & Pepper to taste

Instructions

  • Combine all ingredients in a sauce pan and cook over low heat until lard has melted and is clear.
  • Transfer to a container with a lid and chill until firm.
  • Using an electric mixer, whip until fluffy.
  • Keep chilled and serve with bread or crackers.

Pork & Potato Stew

This is one of my favorite stew recipes. I made this recipe yesterday and the house smelled great all day while the broth was simmering. A fresh pork hock (also known as a ham hock) is perfect for soups and stews and deserves more credit than its given. This cut is from the leg area directly below the ham and has a large bone and good quantity of meat. After simmering in the broth the meat is tender and easily pulls apart. A hock can be used in a recipe that calls for a ham bone – want the smokey cured flavor? Just add a few of slices of bacon!

Interested in purchasing a hock or two? CLICK HERE to see what we currently have in stock or CONTACT US

Pork & Potato Stew

Not your typical potato soup. A little spicy, a little sweet, and a lot of flavor.
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Course: Main Course, Soup
Cuisine: American
Keyword: pork
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 8 hours
Total Time: 8 hours 20 minutes
Servings: 8 servings
Author: Laura Tidrick

Equipment

  • Stock Pot or Crock Pot

Ingredients

For the Broth

  • 1 Mossycup Farms Pork Hock or 2lbs pork bones
  • 1 Pork Trotter
  • 5 quarts Water
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 Onion large, sliced
  • 4 stalks Celery
  • 3 cloves Garlic

For the Stew

  • 1 bunch Celery
  • 1 Onion large
  • 5 Purple Potatoes
  • 2 Sweet Potatoes
  • 1 head Cauliflower
  • 1 lb Spicy Italian Sausage
  • 4 slices Bacon
  • Pork Reserved from Hocks
  • 1 can Coconut Milk or Coconut Cream
  • Cabbage optional, chopped
  • 2 Carrots optional, chopped
  • 1 bunch Spinach optional
  • 1 bunch Kale optional

Instructions

  • Rinse hock and trotter well and add to stock or crock pot along with water, salt, onion, garlic, and celery over medium-high heat.
  • Once the water begins to boil, reduce heat to low and continue to simmer for 4 - 8 hours, stirring occasionally. Can be simmered longer, up to overnight.
  • Remove broth from heat source and strain through a mesh strainer or cheesecloth into a clean pot. Reserve meat from hock for later use.
  • While the broth is cooking, prepare the stew ingredients. Brown the Italian Sausage and remove from pan. Chop celery and onion and sauté in reserved fat from the Italian Sausage until onion is translucent.
  • Chop purple and sweet potatoes, cauliflower, and bacon into bite-sized chunks and add to broth along with celery and onion. Cook over medium heat until the potatoes are soft.
  • Add Italian Sausage, reserve pork hock meat, and coconut milk. Cook until well heated.

 

Baking Old Cookie Recipe With Lard

The following  was sent to me by my friend, Elda Stone.  She is new to lard and I was happy to share a jar of leaf lard with her so she could experiment with an old family recipe.  I don’t pretend to be a writer but she is a great one and I’m thrilled that she was willing to take the time to record her thoughts so I could share them here.

Baking Old Cookie Recipe With Lard

By Elda Stone

12/18/2018

My sister Rita and I recently resurrected a cookie recipe that we remembered from childhood. We know it as “Grossmutter’s Butterzeug.”

These cut-out sugar cookies, spiced with cinnamon and cloves, were not my favorite as a kid. They were simple and plain, with no frosting. What, no frosting? But I still remember the distinctive taste, the thinness, and the crisp snap.

Grossmutter is what my dad and his sister called their grandmother Babette Gehbauer Helmreich (1863-1948). Babette came over from Germany just before the start of World War I, joining her daughters who immigrated a decade earlier as teenagers. We never knew Babette, but our aunt and grandma made these cookies every year at Christmas.

Butterzeug calls for butter, of course. Google roughly translates “zeug” (pronounced “zoig”) as “stuff” or “material.” Our handwritten recipe card, recorded by Rita years ago while Grandma made the cookies, calls for a pound of butter or “half butter, half lard.”

Lard – yuck. I had never tried baking with it.

Rita and I made a half-batch of the original recipe over Thanksgiving, using all butter. (A full batch must make a massive amount of cookies!)

Even after chilling, the dough was miserably soft for rolling out and transferring to a baking sheet. It stuck to the mat and rolling pin, falling apart out of the cookie cutters. We managed to bake them, and they tasted reasonably like we remembered our grandma’s cookies, but a little too soft and not as thin.

Having heard my friend Laura of Mossycup Farms talk about the virtues of lard, I wanted to try a “test kitchen” experiment in comparative baking. Laura supplied me with a jar of her home-rendered pork lard, from her organically fed, free-range hogs. It was surprisingly light, fluffy, and brilliantly white.

I again made a small batch of Butterzeug, this time with half butter and half lard. I wrapped two flattened disks of dough in wax paper and chilled them in the fridge overnight.

The next day, the dough was very firm and easy to handle. It took some elbow grease to roll out the chilled disks. I was able to get it thinner than last time, and it still held together. I baked according to directions, same as the all-butter batch.

I had saved a couple cookies from the first batch to compare taste. For ease of handling and texture, the half-butter/half-lard version is better and tastes more like I remember. The cookies are definitely more crisp, possibly because I was able to roll the dough thinner. There’s a shortbread-like crumble to the tongue. This version also browned up a little if I pushed the baking time another minute.

I certainly don’t notice any “porky” flavor from the lard. I’m surprised it resulted in firmer dough and crispier cookies, despite lard’s low melting temperature and light texture.

This article from Prevention magazine sums up the re-evaluation of lard.,  And it sounds much preferable to coconut oil, which has also been touted in recent years. Using half Crisco or other commercial shortening might also make this recipe easier to roll out and cut, but I’m more leery of using a processed product these days.

So that’s my pseudo-scientific study on lard in a cookie recipe! Christmas cookies by any definition are A) only made at Christmas and B) not really supposed to be good for you. It’s more about the taste, texture, and visual delight. Lard delivered the taste of my childhood holidays.

And making this family recipe brings back to life my aunt, my grandma, and my great-grandmother, standing behind me in the kitchen.

 

Real Ramen with Bone Broth & Shiitake Mushrooms

Making bone broth takes time but doesn’t have to be time consuming.  I used to think I needed to watch it the whole time it was cooking but I’ve since realized it can pretty much be left alone.  I’ll often throw a 10 qt pot full of bones, hocks or necks with whatever herbs I have in the garden on the stove in the morning and pretty much forget about it until my house starts to smell amazing which usually means its close to being done.

I stopped at the Clear Lake Farmers Market on Saturday morning and grabbed a few bunches of fresh green onions among other things.  I had purchased shiitake mushrooms from a local producer here in Clear Lake (email me for their contact information if you’d like it) and was looking for more ways to use them.  I love real ramen – not the cheap stuff at the grocery store with a dry seasoning mix – and decided to make it myself (recipe below).

I decided to use pork hocks for the broth in this batch but pork or chicken bones would also work.  The added benefit of hocks is that they’re actually pretty meaty so you get a really nice bone broth and a good amount of meat to serve with your soup.  If you prefer a thicker stock adding a pigs foot or a handful of chicken necks will give you a wonderfully thick, gelatinous broth.  Click Here for a good read on all of the uses for pigs feet.

The recipe calls for 5 quarts of water but I chose to make a double batch and ended up with a full meal for our family plus I was able to jar and pressure can an additional 4 quarts for use later.  Extra broth could also be frozen if canning isn’t your thing.

Here’s the recipe – I hope you enjoy it as much as we did!  Need hocks or bones for your stock?  Contact us to purchase some!

Real Ramen with Bone Broth & Shiitake Mushrooms

Making bone broth takes time but doesn’t have to be time consuming.  I used to think I needed to watch it the whole time it was cooking but I’ve since realized it can pretty much be left alone.  I’ll often throw a 10 qt pot full of bones, hocks or necks with whatever herbs I have in the garden on the stove in the morning and pretty much forget about it until my house starts to smell amazing which usually means its close to being done.
Print Pin
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Chinese
Keyword: pork
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 5 hours
Marinating: 3 hours
Total Time: 8 hours 20 minutes
Servings: 8 servings
Author: Laura Tidrick

Equipment

  • Stock Pot or Crock Pot
  • Saucepan

Ingredients

For the Broth

  • 1 Mossycup Farms Pork Hock or 2lbs pork bones
  • 5 quarts Water
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 bunch Green Onions tops removed
  • 1 Onion large, sliced
  • 1 tsp Ginger fresh grated
  • 5 cloves Garlic
  • 5 Shiitake Mushrooms fresh

Toppings

  • Ramen Noodles
  • 11 bunch Green Onions
  • 5 Shiitake Mushrooms fresh
  • Pork Reserved from Hocks
  • Cabbage optional
  • Carrots optional, shredded
  • Spinach optional
  • Bok Choy optional

Marinated Eggs

  • 4 Free Range Eggs soft boiled
  • ¼ cup Mirin or Rice Wine Vinegar
  • ¼ cup Soy Sauce
  • ½ cup Water

Instructions

  • Rinse hock and trotter well and add to stock or crock pot along with water, salt, green onion, onion, ginger, garlic, and mushrooms over medium-high heat.
  • Once the water begins to boil, reduce heat to low and continue to simmer for 4 - 8 hours, stirring occasionally. Can be simmered longer, up to overnight.
  • While the broth is cooking, prepare the eggs. Add fresh eggs to a pot of boiling water and cook for 6 to 10 minutes. Remove and place directly into an ice bath to cool. Add mirin, soy sauce, and water to a small sauce pan and reduce over medium-low heat until slightly thickened. Allow to cool and then pour over peeled eggs. Allow to marinate for 1 to 3 hours.
  • Remove broth from heat source and strain through a mesh strainer or cheesecloth into a clean pot.
  • Return broth to stove over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil and cook ramen noodles in the broth. Ladle into bowls and add eggs and desired toppings.